Let No One Cause Me Trouble

But far be it from me to boast except in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, by which the world has been crucified to me, and I to the world. For neither circumcision counts for anything, nor uncircumcision, but a new creation. And as for all who walk by this rule, peace and mercy be upon them, and upon the Israel of God. From now on let no one cause me trouble, for I bear on my body the marks of Jesus. The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with your spirit, brothers. Amen.
(Galatians 6:14-18)

“From now on let no one cause me trouble…”

Let’s think about what Paul just said to the Galatian Christians and why it was so significant.

I bear in my body the marks of the Lord Jesus. What had Paul gone through? I’m not sure when Galatians was written, but I do know that Paul is addressing the new Galatian Christians. We see their conversions in Acts 13-14. And then we see the conflict about circumcision and keeping the Law that arose in Acts 15. This is the foundation for Paul’s letter.

The point in bringing this up is…Paul had to deal with these new Christians who were fighting among themselves. He had to bring them back to the one Gospel. Apparently some were taking some very nasty shots at Paul, and had now become his enemy because he was telling them the truth. So, Paul lovingly deals with them and leads them through all of this, which really would have been unnecessary if they all just focused on the Gospel.

But after all of that, Paul tells them, “From now on let no one cause me trouble,” but why? He said that his body couldn’t handle much more of what they were throwing at him. I want you to take time to look at what Paul went through just in Acts 13 and 14. Please don’t just read the facts, listen and think about what Paul went through physically, spiritually and emotionally. He had been argued with every step of the way. In fact, the heat of persecution must have been pretty intense, because John Mark bailed in chapter 13. Wherever Paul went, envious hypocrites were following him from city to city to oppose him and stir up trouble. People went from worshiping him to trying to murder him. He was stoned almost to the point of death, dragged out of the city and left for dead. Many times Paul didn’t know if he was going to be received well or be beaten and killed. Tons of uncertainty on a daily basis for Paul.

But Paul doesn’t quit, does he? No, he got up, went back into the city after just having been stoned. He continues to preach Jesus. He’s going back through those same cities and encouraging the Christians to keep going. Elders are appointed in each church. I believe when Paul leaves the Galatian region with stable churches with elders that he thinks they are in a good state. We learn from Galatians 1 that Paul was surprised and marveled that they so soon had left from their focus on the one Gospel. After everything that Paul had done for them and went through for them, now he has to deal with all of this fighting and falseness among the Galatians.

Please consider this just as a human being. What had he been through? Was it traumatic what Paul endured in Galatia? Absolutely! He had suffered trauma at every level. When Paul said, “I bear in my body the marks of the Lord Jesus,” that was no exaggeration. His body was literally broken. I’m sure he was filled with scars all over his body. But those were not the only scars. Friends, we have to understand that what Paul went through did not just affect his body. It was no small thing that he went through. Someone cannot go through what Paul did and it not drastically injure his emotions and brain. Physically, Paul was a broken man. The man needed a break and some rest.

So, how could these brethren help Paul? Leave him alone. Give him a break. Get along. The best thing those Christians could do is to focus on the Gospel and get busy in the kingdom saving souls.

More to come later, Lord willing.

What about Grief?

A dear friend, who has just gone through a tragic loss, said to me, “I need to be strong but I feel so much grief.”  Deep sorrow and anguish is a natural response to significant loss or suffering but is it a contrast to strength?  As men, we often make the mistake of believing that strength is suppressing our grief and not allowing it to be seen.  When we do this we not only cause ourselves harm but we are also missing an opportunity to positively impact the family of God.  We need to redefine our definition of strength.

Please read the text below from II Corinthians 1:3-11 and consider some observations.

Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our affliction so that we will be able to comfort those who are in any affliction with the comfort with which we ourselves are comforted by God. For just as the sufferings of Christ are ours in abundance, so also our comfort is abundant through Christ. But if we are afflicted, it is for your comfort and salvation; or if we are comforted, it is for your comfort, which is effective in the patient enduring of the same sufferings which we also suffer; and our hope for you is firmly grounded, knowing that as you are sharers of our sufferings, so also you are sharers of our comfort.

For we do not want you to be unaware, brethren, of our affliction which came to us in Asia, that we were burdened excessively, beyond our strength, so that we despaired even of life; indeed, we had the sentence of death within ourselves so that we would not trust in ourselves, but in God who raises the dead; 10 who delivered us from so great a peril of death, and will deliver us, He on whom we have set our hope. And He will yet deliver us, 11 you also joining in helping us through your prayers, so that thanks may be given by many persons on our behalf for the favor bestowed on us through the prayers of many.

  • “…just as the sufferings of Christ are ours in abundance, so also our comfort is abundant through Christ.” (5): There is a direct correlation between the suffering and grief we experience and the comfort we experience in Christ.  To deny the grief is to deny the comfort of Christ.
  • “…we were burdened excessively, beyond our strength…so that we would not trust in ourselves, but in God who raises from the dead” (8-9): There is a lesson to be learned in all suffering and grief.  The pain of grief should be a reminder that we are not adequate, in and of ourselves, to handle the ups and downs of this life.  The grief should be a reminder of our lack of control.  To deny the grief is to deny God’s strength.
  • “…He on whom we have set our hope.” (10): Suffering and grief should remind us of the temporary nature of this life.  Properly embracing the grief will force us to place our hope in God, the only stable foundation we have in this world.  To deny the grief is to misplace our hope.
  • “…who delivered us from so great a peril of death, and will deliver us…” (10): Allowing grief to turn our eyes towards God will strengthen our faith.  As we leave one storm behind us and head towards the next, we will be secure in the knowledge that He has delivered us and will deliver us again.  To deny our grief is to head towards the future unprepared.
  • “…who comforts us in all our affliction so that we will be able to comfort those who are in any affliction” (4): Suppressing our pain and grief is ultimately selfish.  We do not live in a vacuum and every tragedy and every hardship is an opportunity to be shaped and molded into a useful instrument for God.  God is preparing you because somewhere out there someone needs comforted.  To deny our grief is to fail our brothers.
  • “…so that thanks may be given my many persons on our behalf for the favor bestowed on us through the prayers of many.” (11): Worst of all, when we fail to embrace our grief and refuse to allow God to use us we are robbing Him of the thanks that He deserves.  In a way, we are stealing His glory.  Allowing others to see our pain provides them opportunity to be involved in prayer and encouragement and when we have come through the storm God will be glorified.   To deny our grief is to deny God His glory.

Grief is a powerful force in our lives.  We can suppress it and render ourselves useless in His kingdom.  We can succumb to it and allow it to cloud our vision and erode our hope.  Or we can embrace it, be trained by it, and become effective tools in the hands of our Creator.  It is our choice.