Do You See This Woman?

Luke 7:44 – Do you see this woman?

Here are two sisters in Christ who are African American. What they are going to say might make you uncomfortable. Many of us have lived in denial and dismissal that racism still exists, but have we listened to our black brothers and sisters in Christ? Have we asked them what they think and what their viewpoint is?

Take some time to watch this video by sister Nikki Lee and by sister Tranae Felicien. Hear their pain. As you can see in the above verse, Jesus had to get the Simon the Pharisee to stop for a minute and get out of his safe and comfortable box of prejudice to see the woman who came in to anoint Jesus. Today Jesus wants us to listen, to truly see others and to hear their pain.

Sister Nikki Lee’s heartfelt call to see her and her son and her husband for what they are enduring.

 

Here is sister Tranae Felicien’s post on how hurt she is by the blindness and dismissal she had witnessed from her brothers and sisters in Christ.

Written by Tranae Felicien

When there was a death from systemic racism, I used to feel pressure to end a post on a hopeful note about the future of America. But I’ve stopped holding my breath that America, as a society, will ever rid itself of its racism. Part of my evidence lies in the life experiences I and my community have survived. Part of my evidence lies in the years I’ve been on the incredibly illuminating social media apps.

I see your posts about Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd. I see the ones who have decided to use their pages to educate. But I also see the ones who have only posted about the looting or only to say “not all cops”. I see the people commenting “I am with you” but your pages are silent. And I’ll see your silence about Trump greenlighting shooting his own people over property.

I see those who have posted about mask requirements being a denial of rights but never about racism. I see your posts about abortion but never about racism’s fatalities. I see the posts that are scared to say racism but resort to general admonitions of love. I see the people that say “all we can do is pray.” I see the people who continue to be confused at the way black people are treated in this country, but between this week’s comment and the last, they didn’t care enough to Google.

I saw your posts about Michelle Obama being a transgender woman. I saw your posts about Obama causing a “race war”, blaming a black man for people being fed up with racism. I saw your dismissals of past black viral tragedies, even those on video (Botham Jean, Tamir Rice, Philando Castile to name a few). I saw you dismiss deaths as isolated incidents though DOJ investigations found patterns of discrimination within entire police forces.

I saw you say Blue Lives Matter when the spotlight was on black lives. I saw you rant about Colin Kaepernick’s non-violent, peaceful protest. I’ve seen the people who selectively quote MLK and the Bible to try to instruct black people not to cause trouble. Yet, you ignored quotes about condemnation for injustice and passiveness in the face of discrimination. I saw you try to excuse past Americans for slavery, as if they even cared about their descendants’ opinions of the way they dealt with their “property.” I saw you get heated about a dead flag of traitors literally fighting for the continued enslavement of black people.

What is the point of this post? Simply to let you know I see you. You may have been able to live your life in ignorance of racism’s pervasiveness but I have not. This is not a post to beg you to change. It’s a post to take you out of your comfort zone, the comfort zone I’ve never had being black in this country.

Some of you will start or continue to work for an actively anti-racist society. Some of you will post “in solidarity” but never examine yourself and your circle. Some of you will be upset that I’m not acknowledging private emotional disturbances from these newest fatalities, yet not see the reason why I don’t care if you felt bad briefly for others but said/did nothing about an issue every can affect in ways big or small. Some of you will think that racism is left in a few individuals and not ever contemplate that racism manifests in interactions less than death as it is systemic. Some of you will think black people continue to make all this up and will comfort yourselves with black voices who are paid to make you feel better.

Some of you may even look at this post and feel anger at me because you see yourself in some of my negative examples. Some of you may feel like I am not entitled to dictate what you post. You’d be right and also miss my point. Some of you may be upset that I’m making it seem like I have nothing to work on as a person, and you’d be incorrect as I am only addressing racism against black people. Again, you missed my point. Some of you may even find me ungrateful as I have had many amazing life experiences as a result of my family’s emigration here, having no knowledge of the price we paid in being just another black family here and the many black Americans denied my upbringing through the effects of racism. Some of you may find this post un-Christlike, but the white American version of Christianity that produces Christians more devoted to comfort than lessening injustices is a far departure from the Bible.

There are no congratulations in reaching the end of my post. But in parting, I leave a quote from MLK’s “The Other America” speech. And I want you to know that if you ever see my name trending because I’m victim of systemic racism, you’re going to see me fight back in that video. When the Lord welcomes me home, I’ll finally have an unburdened joy as no racists will be there.