He can deal gently

He can deal gently with the ignorant and wayward, since he himself is beset with weakness.
(Hebrews 5:2)

Since he himself is beset with weakness. I looked up the word that is translated “beset” here in Heb. 5:2. The mental picture I get from this word is something that surrounds us, hangs about us and binds us. That is a very accurate picture of sin, isn’t it?

Why could the priest “deal gently” with those who are weak and wayward? Because he understands at a very personal level the weight and power of sin that can overwhelm us. The result of his sinful struggles was not hardness and judgmental-ism, but rather compassion and mercy. He knows the struggle.

It is the same for us today as Christians. We are all priests of God in His royal priesthood (1 Peter 2). We all know the weight of sin and how it can hang about our necks, surround us, and bind us. What is (should be) the resulting attitude in our hearts toward others? Compassion. Dealing gently. Why? Because we understand. We get it.

…to speak evil of no one, to avoid quarreling, to be gentle, and to show perfect courtesy toward all people. For we ourselves were once foolish, disobedient, led astray, slaves to various passions and pleasures, passing our days in malice and envy, hated by others and hating one another. But when the goodness and loving kindness of God our Savior appeared, he saved us..
(Titus 3:2-7)

Trust – Not Knowing

By faith Abraham obeyed when he was called to go out to a place that he was to receive as an inheritance. And he went out, not knowing where he was going.
(Heb 11:8)

Trust. In order to trust another, it by definition means you don’t have all the answers and information. You don’t possess all the details and you are going on the word of someone else.

Abraham was told to take his family and his corporation and go. Go where? Go where God told him to go! That’s not a lot of information to go on, is it? But it was all the information Abraham needed.

Sometimes we really geek out on the details and have to know all the information. God doesn’t work that way with us. He wants us to trust in Him and His promises without having all the facts. You will not be able to know how everything is going to turn out in specificity. The Lord isn’t going to send us a spreadsheet with charts.

I’ll leave you with a short passage from Exodus that tells of the Israelites crossing the Red Sea. They didn’t have all the information and details. Their job was to be silent and go forward. Trust God and let Him take care of the rest.

And Moses said to the people, “Fear not, stand firm, and see the salvation of the LORD, which he will work for you today. For the Egyptians whom you see today, you shall never see again. The LORD will fight for you, and you have only to be silent.” The LORD said to Moses, “Why do you cry to me? Tell the people of Israel to go forward.
(Exodus 14:13-15)

Yet You have brought us out

I want to share Psalm 66 with you today. Here the Psalmist talks about hardships and what God allows to happen, but what God does through those trials and after those trials.

The one phrase I really like here is, “Yet you brought us out into a place of abundance.” Regardless of the “abundance” part, He brought us out. We go through the trials, we pass through the fire and water, but God brings us out. That means He was with us all along in the trial walking with us and leading us through it.

Keep that in mind today, men.

Psalm 66:8-20

8  Bless our God, O peoples;
let the sound of his praise be heard,
9 who has kept our soul among the living
and has not let our feet slip.
10 For you, O God, have tested us;
you have tried us as silver is tried.
11 You brought us into the net;
you laid a crushing burden on our backs;
12 you let men ride over our heads;
we went through fire and through water;
yet you have brought us out to a place of abundance.

13 I will come into your house with burnt offerings;
I will perform my vows to you,
14 that which my lips uttered
and my mouth promised when I was in trouble.
15 I will offer to you burnt offerings of fattened animals,
with the smoke of the sacrifice of rams;
I will make an offering of bulls and goats. Selah

16 Come and hear, all you who fear God,
and I will tell what he has done for my soul.
17 I cried to him with my mouth,
and high praise was on my tongue.
18 If I had cherished iniquity in my heart,
the Lord would not have listened.
19 But truly God has listened;
he has attended to the voice of my prayer.

20 Blessed be God,
because he has not rejected my prayer
or removed his steadfast love from me!

Lord, Increase Our Faith

This year at our congregation we are focusing on the theme, “Lord, Increase Our Faith,” which comes from Luke 17:5.

And he said to his disciples, “Temptations to sin are sure to come, but woe to the one through whom they come! It would be better for him if a millstone were hung around his neck and he were cast into the sea than that he should cause one of these little ones to sin. Pay attention to yourselves! If your brother sins, rebuke him, and if he repents, forgive him, and if he sins against you seven times in the day, and turns to you seven times, saying, ‘I repent,’ you must forgive him.” The apostles said to the Lord, “Increase our faith!” And the Lord said, “If you had faith like a grain of mustard seed, you could say to this mulberry tree, ‘Be uprooted and planted in the sea,’ and it would obey you.
(Luke 17:1-6)

Yesterday, I shared 3 simple points during the sermon about increasing our faith. There are several passages in Scripture about our faith growing. It’s not like God gave you a 10-pound bag of faith when you became a Christian and said, “This is your lifetime allotment.”

#1. Our faith is constantly challenged.

I’m not trying to be negative and pessimistic, but it just the reality we are going to face some really tough things in life. Whether we are pagans or believers we will go through dark valleys. Even more so for the Christian, though, because the devil is coming at us with great wrath (Revelation 12:12; 2 Timothy 3:12).

Our faith, in order to grow, will do so through adversity. Look at the above passage in Luke 17. Jesus was talking about relationships, pain, and forgiveness. The disciples realized how difficult His instructions were to follow, and they knew that their faith needed to grow to meet the challenge.

Another example is of the man whose son was demon-possessed in Mark 9. The disciples could not cast it out because of a lack of faith and a lack of prayer (Mark 9:19,29). When Jesus came to the father, he told the father that all things were possible if he believed. Here is the father’s response:

Immediately the father of the child cried out and said, “I believe; help my unbelief!”
(Mark 9:24)

I think we can relate with that. In the midst of the trial our faith is revealed and tested, and we see our need for growth and our great desire to draw closer to Jesus.

#2. Our faith, with God’s help will rise to meet the challenge/trial.

We ought always to give thanks to God for you, brothers, as is right, because your faith is growing abundantly, and the love of every one of you for one another is increasing. Therefore we ourselves boast about you in the churches of God for your steadfastness and faith in all your persecutions and in the afflictions that you are enduring.
(2 Thessalonians 1:3-4)

The brethren at Thessalonica were bragged about by Paul everywhere he went, but why? Because of their faith! But notice the faith they had was in the midst of “persecutions and…afflictions” they were enduring. We also see in this passage that during those hardships their faith was “growing abundantly.” Their faith was growing to meet the trials at hand.

#3. Jesus, His word, and His people help to increase that faith.

The Word

So faith comes from hearing, and hearing through the word of Christ.
(Romans 10:17)

Jesus

looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith...
(Hebrews 12:2)

Our brothers and sisters

Take care, brothers, lest there be in any of you an evil, unbelieving heart, leading you to fall away from the living God. But exhort one another every day, as long as it is called “today,” that none of you may be hardened by the deceitfulness of sin.
(Hebrews 3:12-13)

Do you see that in order to grow our faith we need all the above? It’s the stuff preachers and grandmas have been telling us our whole lives, and when we find ourselves falling and stumbling it is because we are forgetting these three things. The Word creates and builds faith, the brethren encourage us and strengthen our faith, and Jesus perfects it.

“Lord, increase our faith.”

 

Is anything too hard for Me?

In Jeremiah, 32 we find Jeremiah sitting in prison. He has been preaching and warning Judah and her kings for decades. Babylon, led by Nebuchadnezzar, is once again surrounding Jerusalem. This is the third wave of attack brought about by God through the hands of Babylon. During this siege, the whole city and Solomon’s temple will be destroyed and burned to the ground.

While Jeremiah sits in prison for preaching the words of God, he is told by God to buy his relative’s field in Anathoth, bury the purchase agreement and deed in an earthen vessel that it may stay there a long time. Why? Because God was foretelling through a sign that the people of God will one day come back from captivity and buy and sell land in Israel.

This must have sounded like the most impossible thing, especially considering the circumstances in which Jeremiah and the people found themselves. Jeremiah follows with a prayer of praise as he recounts the character and merciful works of God in contrast to Judah’s faithlessness.

But we can see the challenge of faith that Jeremiah is having in this prayer. He admits readily that “nothing is too hard for God” (a statement which God turns around and repeats to him). However, at the end of his prayer, his is really struggling with the concept that God’s people will actually come back to this land.

Yet you, O Lord GOD, have said to me, “Buy the field for money and get witnesses”–though the city is given into the hands of the Chaldeans.'”
(Jeremiah 32:25)

Jeremiah is like, I know you said this Lord, but that sounds like hope and light, and this is the most hopeless and darkest situations we could be in. It is at this point that God takes over the conversation, and replies with:

The word of the LORD came to Jeremiah: “Behold, I am the LORD, the God of all flesh. Is anything too hard for me?
(Jeremiah 32:26-27)

God told Jeremiah that yes, Judah will be destroyed and rightly so because of their sins and rejection of God. But God will “restore their fortunes” (vs. 44). “For thus says the LORD: Just as I have brought all this great disaster upon this people, so I will bring upon them all the good that I promise them” (vs. 42).

Trust me, Jeremiah, God is saying. Just as I will bring certain punishment, I will also bring certain hope, restoration and life! Nothing is too hard for God. And this is the the same God we serve today. God is a just God and will punish sinfulness, but He also a God of mercy who seeks to reconcile us to Himself and pour out upon us His blessings (Romans 5). When we are at our most hopeless and darkest places in life we need to remember that.

Nothing is too hard for God.

Swallowing Camels

“Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you tithe mint and dill and cumin, and have neglected the weightier matters of the law: justice and mercy and faithfulness. These you ought to have done, without neglecting the others. You blind guides, straining out a gnat and swallowing a camel! “Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you clean the outside of the cup and the plate, but inside they are full of greed and self-indulgence. You blind Pharisee! First clean the inside of the cup and the plate, that the outside also may be clean. “Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! For you are like whitewashed tombs, which outwardly appear beautiful, but within are full of dead people’s bones and all uncleanness. So you also outwardly appear righteous to others, but within you are full of hypocrisy and lawlessness.
(Matthew 23:23-28)

In Jesus’ condemnation and exposure of the Jewish leadership, He makes plain that there are weightier matters of the law: justice, mercy and faith. He then goes on to give a hilarious (and very sad) word picture to illustrate His point. Can you picture someone working so hard to filter or screen his drink to make sure that no unclean insect enters it? Can you then picture the same person swallowing a thousand pound, 6 feet tall camel?

Jesus didn’t want them to neglect any part of the law, but He emphasized clearly that there were “weightier matters” to the law. This reminds me of Micah 6:6-8, when God asked, “What does the Lord require of you but to do justly, love mercy and walk humbly with your God?” We can give thousands of sacrifices, rivers of oil and even offer our own sons to God, but God first a foremost is looking for justice, mercy, humility, and faith.

When Jesus was arrested and on trial, the Jewish leadership once again displayed how they were straining out a gnats while swallowing camels. Read the following excerpt from John’s gospel.

Then they led Jesus from the house of Caiaphas to the governor’s headquarters. It was early morning. They themselves did not enter the governor’s headquarters, so that they would not be defiled, but could eat the Passover. So Pilate went outside to them and said, “What accusation do you bring against this man?” They answered him, “If this man were not doing evil, we would not have delivered him over to you.” Pilate said to them, “Take him yourselves and judge him by your own law.” The Jews said to him, “It is not lawful for us to put anyone to death.” This was to fulfill the word that Jesus had spoken to show by what kind of death he was going to die.
(John 18:28-32)

The Jewish leadership did not want to enter a Gentile leader’s headquarters. Why? Because they would become “unclean” and then they could not partake of the Passover feast. The question I know is obvious, but were they not already unclean? They were unclean because they were aggressively and illegally seeking the death of an innocent man, the Son of God. Malice, hatred, envy, lust and greed filled their hearts. They were defiled indeed. While straining at a gnat (“We can’t enter Pilate’s hall”), they swallowed a camel by murdering Jesus.

Today, let’s focus on the camels first. Are we swallowing camels? Does justice, mercy, humility and faith rule our hearts or are we filled with pride, malice, bitterness, lust and rage? If we get the camels right, then we can start worrying about gnats.

Jesus also worded it this way.

“Judge not, that you be not judged. For with the judgment you pronounce you will be judged, and with the measure you use it will be measured to you. Why do you see the speck that is in your brother’s eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ when there is the log in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your brother’s eye.
(Matthew 7:1-5)

How do we respond to overwhelming situations?

How do we respond to overwhelming situations; situations beyond our control? From the Job study, Job encountered God in the whirlwind proclaiming truths Job had no answer for (Job 42:3), “Who is this that hides counsel without knowledge?’ “Therefore I have declared that which I did not understand, Things too wonderful for me, which I did not know.” Job understood the depth of knowledge and power found in God was certainly beyond a mortal man. Individuals, even great people of faith, find themselves at times in situations that go beyond their comprehension.

Mark 9:2-13: And after six days Jesus took with him Peter and James and John, and led them up a high mountain by themselves. And he was transfigured before them, 3 and his clothes became radiant, intensely white, as no one on earth could bleach them. 4 And there appeared to them Elijah with Moses, and they were talking with Jesus. 5 And Peter said to Jesus, “Rabbi, it is good that we are here. Let us make three tents, one for you and one for Moses and one for Elijah.” 6 For he did not know what to say, for they were terrified. 7 And a cloud overshadowed them, and a voice came out of the cloud, “This is my beloved Son; listen to him.” 8 And suddenly, looking around, they no longer saw anyone with them but Jesus only.

9 And as they were coming down the mountain, he charged them to tell no one what they had seen, until the Son of Man had risen from the dead. 10 So they kept the matter to themselves, questioning what this rising from the dead might mean. 11 And they asked him, “Why do the scribes say that first Elijah must come?” 12 And he said to them, “Elijah does come first to restore all things. And how is it written of the Son of Man that he should suffer many things and be treated with contempt?13 But I tell you that Elijah has come, and they did to him whatever they pleased, as it is written of him.”

Peter, James and John find themselves in an overwhelming encounter. Their Lord finds Himself  changed (transfigured) and standing next to two of the greatest men in the Hebrew faith: Elijah and Moses. Jesus not only stands among them, but carries on a conversation with them.

The disciples seek to understand this and Peter, ever an individual of action makes his decree, “Rabbi, it is good that we are here. Let us make three tents, one for you and one for Moses and one for Elijah.” Before considering the understanding of what Peter is asking to do, recognize Peter is caught up in a very familiar failing found in many of us, acting without understanding.

The Bible tells us, “Every prudent man acts with knowledge, But a fool displays folly (Prov. 13:16).” The Bible tells us in regards to Peter and his fellow disciples, “6 For he did not know what to say, for they were terrified.” Peter said something, because … terror, bewilderment, and ignorance provided his foundation. There are times, even when the compulsion to respond is present Proverbs 17:28 should guide a Believer’s thoughts “Even a fool who keeps silent is considered wise; when he closes his lips, he is deemed intelligent (think about Job placing his hand over his mouth to not speak Job 40:4).” The call to be quick to hear, slow to speak , and slow to wrath should provide additional direction. Peter knew SOMETHING must be done, but did not know what.

God assisted Peter with understanding 7 And a cloud overshadowed them, and a voice came out of the cloud, “This is my beloved Son; listen to him.” Simple and clear direction for all of us, Listen to Jesus, Keep our mouths closed, and do what Jesus says.

Spiritual Leadership Loneliness

Being a spiritual leader can be a very lonely place and in that loneliness, the devil sees a great deal of opportunity.  Let me fill you in on my current situation so you have some background and context.

Towards the end of September I accepted a promotion at work that is truly a great opportunity for my family.  Not only do I get to build and lead a sales force but it also provides us the opportunity to move back home and be closer to family.  In many ways it is an answer to prayers.  But my oh my did I understand the workload!

Since accepting the position in September, I have not been home for more than two days in a row until last week.  In addition to the travel all of my time has been taken up with the intense process of hiring a team, strategic planning, and meeting preparation.  Additionally, I’ve been exposed to a higher level of corporate politics than I expected which has added a great deal of stress.  In my “down” time I have to take care of my current position and lead my current sales team which basically means I’ve been working late into the nights.  Even when I’m home, I’m not really home.

So we take the additional workload, the higher level of responsibility and visibility, mix in a healthy dose of stress and we end up with a potentially toxic situation.  Many of the regular readers of these articles are somewhat familiar with my “troubled” past but let’s just say I’ve spent a great deal of time in the “far country” (Luke 15:13).  I always seem to be blindsided by how quickly, and how powerfully, old temptations come back to knock me for a loop.  You’d think I’d start to expect it by now.  Needless to say the last couple of months have been a struggle in a number of ways.

So let’s get back to the lonely place.  What should I do?  The scripture is very clear about where I should seek encouragement and support.  The Church was designed so that I would have a network of strong brothers to lean on.  Brothers that would listen to my struggles, show me empathy and compassion, and help me through difficult situations.  Not to mention this is the very reason God gave us marriage.  I know this, I’ve preached on this, delivered workshops on this, but I fail to take advantage of the resources God has provided.  Why?

I’m a spiritual leader, that’s why.  Will you allow me a little foolishness?  In my family, among my friends, and in the local body I’m the one with the vision.  I’m the strong man of faith that encourages and lifts others up.  I’m the one that struggling Christians turn to for advice, for prayer, for comfort.  In this position, to open up, to be authentic and admit that I can’t handle the situation would feel like I’m letting others down.  It would almost be a form of betrayal to all those people who have relied on me in the past.  How could I let that happen?  I can’t let that happen!  As a result, I isolate myself, put on a happy face, provide token responses to people genuinely concerned and…give the devil an opportunity.

All of this hit me a couple of weeks ago when I was in Michigan conducting a men’s workshop that was completely focused on the power that others play in our Christian walk (ironic).  The night before I left I was standing in the kitchen with two of my dearest friends on this earth.  We had been talking about my work and the stress it was putting on Kristine and how she was handling it.  During a pause in the conversation, Anna asked me, “And how are you doing?”  I’m sure I provided a few sentences but my response amounted to, “I’m ok”.  What I should have said is, “I’m failing!  I’m drowning!  I’m suffocating!  I feel like I’m juggling chainsaws and torches while one arm is broken and the other is tied behind my back!”  But I didn’t.  Why not?

This might be one of the most irritating articles you read all month because I don’t really have the answers.  I’m sure it has to do with fear and pride and shame and all sorts of other things I need to work on with a therapist but, in reality, I’m sure I’m not alone.  I believe there are a lot of “spiritual leaders” out there that feel the same kind of pressure I do.  Leaders that feel the weight of the world crushing them and feel somewhat helpless when it comes to opening up and taking advantage of the help God has provided through His people.

I have come to realize one thing that has helped, one thing that has given me the strength to at least write this article.  I am strong…and I am weak.  The two are not mutually exclusive.  I am the man of faith that encourages others and lifts them up and I am also the man that struggles and fails.  I am the leader that inspires and motivates and I’m the leader that gets discouraged and deflated.  Both are true.  That is why the only reliable source of strength, strength that never fails, resides in the nature and character of our God.

“Simon, Simon, behold, Satan has demanded to sift you like wheat; but I have prayed for you, that your faith may not fail; and you, when once you have turned again, strengthen your brothers.”  Luke 22:31-31

A Very Humbling Contrast

We were studying Micah last Wednesday night in Bible class, and a sister emailed me afterward with this note:

After reading Micah 7 it is interesting how in Hebrews 10 the word says if we keep willfully sinning we trample Christ under our feet. Then back in Micah 7 it says that God treads our sins underfoot and throws them to the depths of the sea. Such a neat and very humbling contrast. The great terribleness of our deeds to the great awesomeness of the mercy and grace extended from God

Here are the two passages she referenced:

Who is a God like you, pardoning iniquity and passing over transgression for the remnant of his inheritance? He does not retain his anger forever, because he delights in steadfast love. He will again have compassion on us; he will tread our iniquities underfoot. You will cast all our sins into the depths of the sea. You will show faithfulness to Jacob and steadfast love to Abraham, as you have sworn to our fathers from the days of old. (Micah 7:18-20)

For if we go on sinning deliberately after receiving the knowledge of the truth, there no longer remains a sacrifice for sins…How much worse punishment, do you think, will be deserved by the one who has trampled underfoot the Son of God, and has profaned the blood of the covenant by which he was sanctified, and has outraged the Spirit of grace? (Hebrews 10:26,29)

It is truly a humbling contrast for us to ponder today. God has trampled our sins under his feet because He has delighted in steadfast love. God is compassionate and has cast all our sins into the depths of the sea. What then is my attitude and response to that grace, forgiveness and the blood of Christ?

Let us hold up that sacrifice as a sacred treasure by the way we think, the choices we make, the words we say, the places we go, etc. God has trampled on our sins, and it frees us to walk on a holy pathway of righteousness with the blood of Jesus covering our lives.

Where there is forgiveness of these, there is no longer any offering for sin. Therefore, brothers, since we have confidence to enter the holy places by the blood of Jesus, by the new and living way that he opened for us through the curtain, that is, through his flesh, and since we have a great priest over the house of God, let us draw near with a true heart in full assurance of faith, with our hearts sprinkled clean from an evil conscience and our bodies washed with pure water. Let us hold fast the confession of our hope without wavering, for he who promised is faithful. And let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day drawing near.
(Hebrews 10:21-25)

Being a Shechaniah

We were very blessed over the weekend to have Andy Harrison with us. He led our men’s study on Saturday about the power of having a very close intimate brother in Christ. A brother to whom and with whom we can be accountable and vulnerable. Someone who can help us grow to new heights in our walk with God.

Andy used as one of his key examples the man named Shechaniah in the book of Ezra. I encourage you to read Ezra 9-10 and meditate upon it.

The people of Israel returned from captivity, and over time returned to the same sins that sent them away into captivity in the first place. Jewish men who were to be loyal in heart to God were marrying pagan idolatrous women and they were going down the same old road to destruction. When Ezra heard about this he was so sad. Ezra was overwhelmed to the point of being despondent.

Andy pointed out that if you listen to the words and emotions of Ezra in his prayer of chapter 9, one thing you will not see is hope. Ezra is pretty low at this point, and understandably so.

While Ezra was weeping and praying, a great assembly of people gathered around, and one man stood up and spoke up. Look at the progression of what happens; listen to what is said. Take note that Ezra at the beginning is weeping and praying, and at the end he is weeping and acting. It took a Shechaniah to stand up and support Ezra. Shechaniah showed leadership by being a phenomenal example of follower-ship.

Now while Ezra was praying, and while he was confessing, weeping, and bowing down before the house of God, a very large assembly of men, women, and children gathered to him from Israel; for the people wept very bitterly. And Shechaniah the son of Jehiel, one of the sons of Elam, spoke up and said to Ezra, “We have trespassed against our God, and have taken pagan wives from the peoples of the land; yet now there is hope in Israel in spite of this. Now therefore, let us make a covenant with our God to put away all these wives and those who have been born to them, according to the advice of my master and of those who tremble at the commandment of our God; and let it be done according to the law. Arise, for this matter is your responsibility. We also are with you. Be of good courage, and do it.” Then Ezra arose, and made the leaders of the priests, the Levites, and all Israel swear an oath that they would do according to this word. So they swore an oath. Then Ezra rose up from before the house of God, and went into the chamber of Jehohanan the son of Eliashib; and when he came there, he ate no bread and drank no water, for he mourned because of the guilt of those from the captivity. And they issued a proclamation throughout Judah and Jerusalem to all the descendants of the captivity, that they must gather at Jerusalem, and that whoever would not come within three days, according to the instructions of the leaders and elders, all his property would be confiscated, and he himself would be separated from the assembly of those from the captivity.
(Ezra 10:1-8)

What can you see in the words of Shechaniah that would have meant so much to Ezra in his leadership?

  1. Personal accountability. Shechaniah admitted the wrong, and took responsibility for it. He also made himself accountable to being fully supportive as they worked through solving this problem.
  2. Yet now there is hope in Israel in spite of this. Even the greatest leaders can sometimes get hopeless and despair in situations. Paul did (2 Corinthians 1) and so did Elijah (1 Kings 19). Ezra needed hope, he needed Shechaniah to show him that all is not lost. There’s still hope! Don’t we all need that sometimes?
  3. He was willing to help Ezra lead the people in this solution. “Let us make a covenant with our God.” Shechaniah stood up for God and Ezra by being the first to stand up, confess, and show true humility.
  4. Ezra’s advice was valued and promoted. Shechaniah said, we’re going to do this based upon your advice, Ezra. Think of the power that gave the leader when his leadership and his advice were valued.
  5. Shechaniah reminded Ezra of Ezra’s responsibility. As a leader, he needed the reminder that this is his gig and no one can do it for it. “Arise, for this matter is YOUR responsibility.”
  6. Shechaniah gave further encouragement and support that “we are with you!” Ezra couldn’t lead if no one followed, and he had the verbal commitment and encouragement he needed now to stand up and do the hard things. How much power is given to you to perform the hard things when you know that there are brothers in Christ who are “with you”? I mean truly with you. You can run through a brick wall if you have the right support and encouragement. Shechaniah was that person for Ezra.
  7. Ezra rose up (vs. 6,7) because Shechaniah spoke up (vs. 2). Please contemplate this today, men. You need to be that Shechaniah for somebody. There is an Ezra out there who may be giving up hope and you can stand with them to support them in carrying out the mission God has given them. Give somebody hope, support and encouragement today. It may be a church leader. It might be a parent or a spouse. It may be a caregiver. It might be your boss. But be that Shechaniah today.