Word in Action

19 So then, my beloved brethren, let every man be swift to hearslow to speakslow to wrath20 for the wrath of man does not produce the righteousness of God. 21 Therefore lay aside all filthiness and overflow of wickedness, and receive with meekness the implanted word, which is able to save your souls22 But be doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves. (James 1:19-22; NKJV)

Perspective and process.  God gives us His perspective and is teaching us how to see our world from an heavenly perspective.  He also provides us process for our lives and the order does matter.  Here, we are to be swift to hear, slow to speak and slow to wrath.  If we are swift in our hearing of His word then we will have a heart prepared to be swift to hear another while seeking to understand rather than be understood.  This requires us to listen first and not speak first.  It requires us to consider God’s Word, what another is saying, and then humbly respond.  In all of this, we need to remember that wrath comes last not first and that the wrath of man does not produce righteousness of God which should be our goal.

The focus really is us as individuals here and not others.   We are to lay aside filthiness and wickedness so that we can humbly receive His implanted word.  In elevating God and others in our lives, He will save our souls.  If that is the focus, then we can be Godly communicators and humbly maintain our cool.   If we leave evil behind and receive His word, then we will find salvation and share salvation.

All of this is active.  Though we receive and we react to God’s word, we do so deliberately and purposefully.  It might not be a lot each and every day but we focus on and we do what we can in in line with what God’s word says.  This changes us and changes our relationships.  We determine to listen…to God’s word and to others.  We determine to understand and apply it and allow it to work in our lives.  We purposefully turn away from evil and choose good.  In all of it, we are emboldened in our humility and God will work in our lives and our relationships.  Perspective and process do matter to God.  Reflect on His perspective through His word and work to maintain His process in your life.

 

Father of Lights

16 Do not be deceived, my beloved brethren. 17 Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and comes down from the Father of lights, with whom there is no variation or shadow of turning18 Of His own will He brought us forth by the word of truth, that we might be a kind of firstfruits of His creatures. (James 1:16-18)

Perspective and process is what we discussed in verses 12-15.  God’s perspective is heavenly and we can have confidence in what He is doing and has promised to do.  Jesus says in John 15 to “Abide in Me” and to faithfully serve Him despite the highs and lows of our life and the result is eternal life…the crown of life.  That is the process.

In that, the devil will try to mix all that up, sow lies, cause confusion.  But we read here to not be deceived.  To remember that all good gifts and things that come into our lives are from Heaven.  If something is not good, we know it is not from God and we can work to avoid it, flee from it or otherwise escape and resist.

Specifically, God is the God of light and there is no darkness in Him.  Again, a standard we can measure the things in our life by.  God is the God of light and there is no variation or shadow.  God is solid in that He does not move and that He is not empty but is and represents His supreme and awesome power and nature which is fully focused on our restoration and salvation.  He works to build up.  The devil works to tear down.  We can know that God has and is working to restore us…bringing us into the light as He is light.  Our objective is to stay there and remain faithful and we will prevail.

Let me close with a passage from Paul’s letter to Timothy and encourage all of us to move to the light and stay in the light no matter how hard the devil works to yank us back.

11 But you, O man of God, flee these things and pursue righteousness, godliness, faith, love, patience, gentleness. 12 Fight the good fight of faith, lay hold on eternal life, to which you were also called and have confessed the good confession in the presence of many witnesses. 13 I urge you in the sight of God who gives life to all things, and before Christ Jesus who witnessed the good confession before Pontius Pilate, 14 that you keep this commandment without spot, blameless until our Lord Jesus Christ’s appearing, 15 which He will manifest in His own time, He who is the blessed and only Potentate, the King of kings and Lord of lords16 who alone has immortality, dwelling in unapproachable light, whom no man has seen or can see, to whom be honor and everlasting power. Amen. (1 Timothy 6:11-16)

Trials in Poverty and Wealth

Let the lowly brother glory in his exaltation10 but the rich in his humiliation, because as a flower of the field he will pass away. 11 For no sooner has the sun risen with a burning heat than it withers the grass; its flower falls, and its beautiful appearance perishes. So the rich man also will fade away in his pursuits. (James 1:9-11)

We looked at how we can prayerfully deal with trials, how we can triumph in them, and how important our attitude is in all of it.  When considering verses 2-8 and thinking about trials, our minds will more than likely go to the hardships or difficulties we or others are dealing with. Often times those hardships can be related to the lack of or abundance of money and earthly possessions.  It might be easy for us to consider the trials of one who has less money but not think that one with great wealth could face trials as well.  That, however, is what we see in these verses.   We see there are trials for both the poor and the rich and the attitude we should have.

In poverty, we might be tempted to curse God.

In wealth, we might be tempted to forget God.

But we can have joy in both poverty and wealth.  If we are poor, we can rejoice that we have been exalted.  Even if we are poor or have less than another, we can be spiritually rich and on equal footing with all Christians (Revelation 2:8-9).

If we are wealthy or are extremely blessed physically, then we can rejoice that we have been humbled.  The rich are humbled by becoming Christ’s slave and being placed on even footing with all Christians in which wealth means nothing.  This humility is important because a disciple of Christ knows that these riches are temporary, they are not able to save our souls and the love of money is like quicksand and a source of many sorrows brought on by ourselves.

In all of this, asking for and receiving Godly wisdom provides us with the heart and attitude to overcome trials whether rich or poor.  We will understand that we are not secure in our physical blessings.  We thank God for His blessings whatever they are and look to Him for wisdom in our stewardship and desire to have a giving and hospitable heart.  Christ is the great equalizer when it comes to wealth and no matter the size of our bank accounts we all have the same limitless love, mercy, grace and hope in Jesus if we are obedient to Him and His word.  Rejoice with those who rejoice and be prepared to lift another up as they have need and we have the means to provide it.

Receive

17 If then you count me as a partner, receive him as you would me. 18 But if he has wronged you or owes anything, put that on my account. 19 I, Paul, am writing with my own hand. I will repay—not to mention to you that you owe me even your own self besides. 20 Yes, brother, let me have joy from you in the Lord; refresh my heart in the Lord. (Philemon 17-20; NKJV)

The good deed and importance is found in Philemon receiving Onesimus.  Before I start with Philemon, please recognize the Onesimus is returning.  He is determined to reconcile with Philemon though the worst outcome for him could be that Philemon doesn’t reconcile and he lose his life…a punishment that was given to slaves who were disobedient.  This was in the realm of possibility but Onesimus had a heart to go and to reconcile.  As much as Philemon had to receive him, Onesimus had to go.  This cannot be overstated.

Paul urges Philemon to receive him like he would receive Paul.  It seems they shared a close relationship so the picture here is of two dear friends reuniting.  That is what Paul is expecting for Onesimus despite the fact that he had caused Philemon harm.  This shows us what reconciliation looks like.  Forgiveness is not just a lack of retaliation but restoration.  It is about how we receive one another in all circumstances and how we build and develop relationships with one another.

This is how God receives us when we are forgiven.  We do not simply escape the wrath we deserve but He FULLY restores us into a relationship with Him.  Paul paints a clear picture of what this looks like for Philemon and we can glean what it needs to look like in our lives.  Receive one who has wronged you the same way that you would receive one of your closest and dearest brothers or sister.

Paul is a catalyst in this restoration and we can be too.  Philemon might have had a long list of grievances or wrongs and it might have caused him a great internal struggle with what Paul was asking.  But Paul steps in and offers himself to take that debt on.  He doesn’t stop there though.  He doesn’t want a list of wrongs from Philemon that are now a debt on Paul.  What Paul wants Philemon to remember is that we are all indebted to our Lord Jesus and in this case to the one who taught and led us to Him.  Paul simply wants to bring to mind how desperately Philemon needed salvation at one point in time and to return the same offering of grace and forgiveness and restoration to Onesimus which Paul offered to him.  Again, we all can understand what that looks like and at different points play our part as a Paul (catalyst for restoration), Onesimus (willing to go and restored), and Philemon (willing to receive and to restore).

We forgive because we are forgiven.  We erase other’s debts because we have a record of debts that others have against us and a debt we can never repay our God and Father.  We owe our eternal spiritual life to God.  We understand that, then it will be easier to forgive.  We forgive because we are forgiven and we work for restoration in whatever role or situation we find ourselves in.  We work because that is the action we must take in our faith and love for Jesus and each other.

 

Importance of the Good Deed

10 I appeal to you for my son Onesimus, whom I have begotten while in my chains, 11 who once was unprofitable to you, but now is profitable to you and to me.  12 I am sending him back. You therefore receive him, that is, my own heart, 13 whom I wished to keep with me, that on your behalf he might minister to me in my chains for the gospel. 14 But without your consent I wanted to do nothing, that your good deed might not be by compulsion, as it were, but voluntary.  15 For perhaps he departed for a while for this purpose, that you might receive him forever, 16 no longer as a slave but more than a slave—a beloved brother, especially to me but how much more to you, both in the flesh and in the Lord. (Philemon 10-16; NKJV)

The good deed that is presented before Philemon is to forgive and there is no good deed without reconciliation.  Without reconciliation, the opportunity for a negative attitude is a snare for Philemon.  He could have thought “Paul can keep that useless slave” even if it meant financial loss.  It would be worth it not to deal with him anymore.  That doesn’t sound like a good deed to me…even if it made him feel “better”.

If Philemon forgives and reconciles, then all three men are free to work together and Onesimus can be with Philemon and Paul.  Consider our own lives.  We have no problem staying away from people that we have problems with…steering clear of those who have wronged us and harmed us. The hard part is to come face to face with that person and do what is good for the other and not for self. This is what Paul is asking Philemon to do and where the value of the deed lies.

Paul can’t reconcile with Onesimus…there is no reason.  In fact, Paul is excited about how Onesimus has come into his life and the result through the working of God.  Paul offers that just might be the point.  Maybe the reason Onesimus didn’t remain with Philemon for a short period of time was so that they could be together forever.  Not as a useless or unprofitable slave but a brother and fellow worker in Christ.  Paul is offering a heavenly perspective and calling attention to God’s hand in our lives.  We see troubles and hardships, but God sees opportunity.  Many times, our own hardships must be endured for the benefit of others in a way we can’t see. We can, however, trust God’s hand in all of it if we keep a heavenly perspective.

Here, a relationship that was broken and a trust that was violated could be overcome and give way to a new and different relationship in Christ.  How often do our own desires, ambitions, or insecurities in the flesh hold back another?  How often do we act on what we think is right rather than consider God’s way?  Are we withholding spiritual forgiveness, blessings, and love to the detriment of others?  Paul is demonstrating that we can trust God’s hand and to be careful not to hinder His work.

Paul is providing both sides of the case.  Yes, Onesimus has wronged Philemon and that needs to be reconciled.  Paul also calls Onesimus a beloved brother and that much good has happened since Onesimus left and the potential for so much more if they are all reconciled and working together.  Paul has had much joy from Philemon’s love and faith and is encouraged that Philemon will do much more in reconciling with Onesimus.

As you consider this relationship in the context of your life, look to Joseph as well.  How did Joseph come to a point that he could forgive and reconcile with his brothers after all the betrayal?  Joseph recognized that evil done to him was used by God for good.  I am sure this was not an easy thing to come to terms with and it might have been tough for Philemon to reconcile with Onesimus.  We may have the same challenge facing us today.  Can we take a heavenly perspective?  Can we trust God’s hand in our lives?  Will we not give Satan an opportunity to drive a wedge further into the most important relationships we have with our brethren and with our Father?

The bottom-line is this.  We can confidently forgive and reconcile because we know the great power of God in our lives to accomplish good through our hardship. Further, we must forgive and reconcile any chance we get because we have been forgiven and reconciled to God through Jesus every time we needed it and asked for it.  Finally, let’s not ever forget that we are all Onesimus in some way.  We are not perfect. We all sin.  We all hurt others and violate our relationships.  We need forgiveness and we need others to be willing to reconcile.  Therefore, lets open that door with our own attitude and with our willingness to forgive and reconcile.  Have a love and a faith like that.  Be confident that this will bring joy and refreshing to your brethren whether you know it or not.  Stomp on the devil’s head and forgive.  God is doing the heavy lifting…just look up and within and let Him.  Let go and let Him reconcile your life.  How important is that?  It is profoundly and eternally imperative!

Good Deed

Therefore, though I might be very bold in Christ to command you what is fitting, yet for love’s sake I rather appeal to you—being such a one as Paul, the aged, and now also a prisoner of Jesus Christ— 10 I appeal to you for my son Onesimus, whom I have begotten while in my chains, 11 who once was unprofitable to you, but now is profitable to you and to me. 12 I am sending him back. You therefore receive him, that is, my own heart, 13 whom I wished to keep with me, that on your behalf he might minister to me in my chains for the gospel. 14 But without your consent I wanted to do nothing, that your good deed might not be by compulsion, as it were, but voluntary. (Philemon 8-14; NKJV)

In considering this text, do you see the awesome and powerful demonstration of leadership by Paul and made possible by the tremendous followership of Philemon?

We have established this is a tough ask Paul is making of Philemon in receiving Onesimus…a slave of Philemon who has run away and is not profitable.  With that in mind, consider the fact that Paul does not command Philemon and he never uses the words “forgive” or “reconcile”.  What Paul does is “appeal” to Philemon’s character to “receive” Onesimus as a brother in Christ.  Paul knows that Philemon understands this is only possible if he forgives and they are reconciled.  Paul is encouraging Philemon to put his faith and love into action and to further refresh the hearts of the saints.

Why didn’t Paul command him?  I cannot say for certain but I understand the power and joy in others doing the right thing because they choose to rather than because they are told or command to.  I understand the tremendous catalyst of choice.  I have responsibility of leadership in my life whether it is with a colleague, an employee, a child, a spouse, a brother/sister…God has given me specific commands and responsibilities to lead.  Do you see that?  God has given me a work to do (responsibility) and I am accountable to the outcomes of that leadership work…and though the authority is implied…the focus is on the responsibility and the expectation is that I fulfill that responsibility as a Christian who emulates Christ Who is love!  Love in the case of Christ is “choice”!  The catalyst!

Leadership is a result of a cultivated relationship of trust, understanding, and mutual respect which provides the foundation for leading or influencing others towards a common purpose and work.  Paul cultivated this relationship with Philemon.  Philemon demonstrated his heart through his fruit.  Paul trusted the faith and love of Philemon and Philemon trusted Paul’s leadership.

This is what is so awesome in this scenario.  No barking orders.  No insecurity.  No resentment.  All of these are opportunities for Satan to place a wedge and start working a relationship apart.  The more people involved, the more opportunity and this is why leadership is so very important!  Choosing the assume the best of another provides the opportunity for them to exceed your expectations and reduces the opportunity for Satan to divide.

Paul’s letter is all about the need to forgive and how to go about forgiveness.  Paul’s approach is all about trust in Philemon’s character because of Philemon’s actions and fruit.  This is a pattern worth evaluating in our own lives.  If a brother or sister has demonstrated love and faith then we can assume the best of them and that they will demonstrate love and faith now and in the future.  This should provide us with a confidence in each other and relieve the need for “orders” or “commands” but rather open opportunity for encouragement, increased opportunity to serve, and growth.

Forgiveness and reconciliation is a hard work that has to be voluntary for everyone.  We can lead others through forgiveness and reconciliation if we first trust and provide opportunity for reconciliation rather than command that we forgive.  Jesus chose us.  Lets choose each other!

Christian Character

1 Paul, a prisoner of Christ Jesus, and Timothy our brother, to Philemon our beloved friend and fellow laborer, 2 to the beloved Apphia, Archippus our fellow soldier, and to the church in your house: 3 Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.  4 I thank my God, making mention of you always in my prayers, 5 hearing of your love and faith which you have toward the Lord Jesus and toward all the saints, 6 that the sharing of your faith may become effective by the acknowledgment of every good thing which is in you in Christ Jesus. 7 For we have great joy and consolation in your love, because the hearts of the saints have been refreshed by you, brother. (Philemon 1-7; NKJV)

In Paul’s letter to Philemon that was intended for the church with him, there are two central points:  the need to forgive and how to forgive.  This teaching is profitable to us as well.  We live in a selfish, me-first society with grace and true forgiveness being overtaken with ambition and competition.   This influences us and impacts our Christians families, but this letter equips us to better forgive and in modeling that behavior we have opportunity to teach Jesus.

Remember, Paul is writing Philemon because he wants him to forgive and accept Onesimus.  Paul lays the groundwork for his request of Philemon by acknowledging Philemon’s Christian character.  Paul is thankful for Philemon because of his faith and love towards Jesus and all the saints.

This is Philemon’s reputation because he is doing what Christians should do in having and demonstrating love and faith toward brethren.  Further, this is a shared faith between Paul and Philemon which gives us more insight into  Philemon’s work.  He is an extension of Paul in some regards and the work Philemon is doing brings Paul joy and comfort because Paul knows the hearts of God’s people have been refreshed.

We often think that sharing our faith is about teaching the lost, but we  see in the point of this letter that we share our faith with brethren through forgiveness.  Paul is praying that Philemon’s faith will be more effective and to say it another way that Philemon’s faith will be put into action through forgiveness.

I envision this first section of the letter as being very encouraging to Philemon and those around him.  It is good to be part of a work bigger than ourselves and to be recognized and valued for our part in it.  Paul isn’t writing these things to inflate Philemon’s ego but rather to call to mind the intimate and collaborative work Paul and Philemon are doing for the sake of the gospel and God’s people and to bolster Philemon’s spirit.

Encouragement and recognition are a powerful influences.  This is true with our children, spouses, friends, and especially our brethren.  Taking the time to recognize the work already done and the heart demonstrated will encourage and provide opportunity for even more work to be done no matter how hard the task is.  This letter is about the need to forgive and how to forgive and Paul recognizes this is tough stuff.  Paul doesn’t just jump into that rather he center’s Philemon’s heart and mind on the work and the relationship to bolster Philemon for the work that needs to be done.

Forgiveness is hard spiritual, mental, and emotional work.  Just like any other hard labor, if we do not exercise the muscles necessary to do the work before we need them, we will tire quickly, get hurt or be unable to complete the task.  In looking at this first section of the letter, we can see that continual practice of love and faith for Jesus and the saints will prepare us for more and more difficult challenges and opportunity for even greater positive influence for the sake of Christians.

Practice love and faith.  Be encouraged in that work.  Encourage others in their love and faith.  Together we will be quipped to put our faith into action through forgiveness just like Paul and Philemon.

Pilgrims

1 Peter, an apostle of Jesus Christ, To the pilgrims of the Dispersion in Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia, and Bithynia, elect according to the foreknowledge of God the Father, in sanctification of the Spirit, for obedience and sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ: Grace to you and peace be multiplied. (1 Peter 1: 1-2; NKJV)

The power of the internet and digital communication is that we can all reach out and communicate instantly and to so many people.  One could argue that there is a lot of bad or trouble that comes from that but more importantly there is a lot of good and opportunity for positive influence in it.  We are spread out but have the means to be instantly connected.

I am humbled as I write to think about all the different people that read this in all the different places they live.  The nature of our lives in this world puts us in different spots doing different things.  The nature of our society is that we build houses or apartments and for the most part we are stationary.  In being stationary, we get involved in our locale and all the good and bad that goes with it to include our neighborhoods, our economies, our schools, our relationships, etc.  As a matter of fact, I think we can get so focused on those things that it becomes part of our identity.  I am “from” Michigan.  That means something to different people and it is understood that it is different than when I was “from” Alabama.  We live in this world and we have an identity in it, however, it is not THE identity.

We are pilgrims.  This life is temporary.  Our home is Heaven.  We are in the world but not of this world.  Our hope and true family are in Jesus Christ and He reigns from Heaven.  We are here for a purpose and it isn’t to be “from” some place but to demonstrate we are “going” to a very a special place and our hope is that our manner of life will provide an opportunity to participate in another being uprooted from their sinful life and join the journey from earth to Heaven with Jesus..to join our pilgrimage.

We are pilgrims who have decided and committed ourselves to obedience to the gospel of Jesus Christ and therefore we are God’s elect…His children.  Jesus offered Himself as a sacrifice and His blood spilled so that we would be saved and reconciled to the Father.  Believing that and valuing our lives in that context, we sojourn on and look for rest in Heaven.

We are blessed to live where are at and to serve with the opportunities afforded us in that place.  There is no right place to live and there is nothing wrong with living in one particular place.  We have work to do and it can be done where we are at.  The trap set by the devil is to get us to over-identify with that place and forgetting where home really is.  The trap is focusing so intently in the permanence of a location and a point in time that we lose heavenly perspective and forget to move…as a pilgrim…spiritually closer to home.  I am thankful to be “from” Michigan and to have brothers and sisters here and elsewhere.  I am so very thankful that Jesus has gone ahead of me and has prepared an even more awesome eternal resting place with Him.

Life is hard and troubles come no matter where you are “from”.  Don’t forget to look up…to keep moving toward your heavenly home…and to be aware of those who might be stuck in the world or are ready to throw down their life of bondage in sin and join the journey with Jesus.  Sojourn on with joy and hope!

Deny Self

24 Then Jesus said to His disciples, “If anyone desires to come after Me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow Me. 25 For whoever desires to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for My sake will find it. 26 For what profit is it to a man if he gains the whole world, and loses his own soul? Or what will a man give in exchange for his soul? 27 For the Son of Man will come in the glory of His Father with His angels, and then He will reward each according to his works.28 Assuredly, I say to you, there are some standing here who shall not taste death till they see the Son of Man coming in His kingdom.” (Matthew 16:24-28; NKJV)

A couple points from this passage and a whole lot for us to consider, meditate on, and practice.

A definition for deny is “refuse to give or grant (something requested or desired) to (someone).”  Here, the someone is ourselves.  Jesus is saying that if we want to be His disciple we must deny following what we want and choose to follow what He has commanded and the example He has shown.  Taking this further, if we look at His example, Jesus denied everything except to do the Father’s will.  In every relationship and every circumstance to include the cross, Jesus denied Himself and chose His Father.  We can use this template in our own relationships and circumstances and if we find ourselves not entering the situation prayerfully or with a heavenly perspective, then we are not denying ourselves and following Jesus.  If we are not denying ourselves and following Jesus, then how can we possible deny ourselves and serve others.  If we deny ourselves, then Jesus and those we are interacting with become the most important.  If others are most important, than we will work to see the situation from their perspective and determine what we can do to serve them and their needs…not our own.

Second point, the cross is a symbol of one thing and one thing only…death.  Death is a complete and final act.  We understand what death looks like.  Life does not continue in that form.  Therefore, when we deny ourselves and follow Jesus, we are not taught to do it “just a little”.  We are taught to completely put off our selfishness, follow Jesus, and serve others.  Jesus doesn’t teach us that it is a one time thing.  We have to do this daily and because we are human, it means we will be faced with the choice to die to our own desires, denying ourselves and following Jesus many-many times in a day.  We have to die to ourselves daily to serve Jesus.

I know that when self is promoted, emotions generated from selfishness are acted on, and a loss of heavenly perspective occurs…I get myself in all kinds of trouble and those around me are impacted.  I also know that when this happens it is a snowball…rolling down a hill gaining mass and speed  and bounding over anything in its path until it slams into the unmovable Rock and shatters leaving only a gouge and debris field.  Why don’t I skip that part and just deny myself, die daily, and follow Jesus?  I know I would be better for it and so would those around me…most importantly those I love.

House of Mourning

1 A good name is better than precious ointment, and the day of death than the day of one’s birth; Better to go to the house of mourning than to go to the house of feasting, for that is the end of all men; and the living will take it to heart3 Sorrow is better than laughter, for by a sad countenance the heart is made better.  The heart of the wise is in the house of mourning, but the heart of fools is in the house of mirth. It is better to hear the rebuke of the wise, than for a man to hear the song of fools. (Ecclesiastes 7:1-5; NKJV)

Today we will gather to celebrate the victory in Jesus of our dear sister.  It is indeed a celebration and that was what she asked we do today.  There will be sorrow to be sure because we miss her.  She lived a life that is amplified in the lives of the ones she influenced and participated in.  And today she will give once again as we reflect on her life in Jesus and draw encouragement and example in continuing to strive for the gospel.  Her name is a good name.  Her life wisely lived.  All of which echos in eternity.

The book of Ecclesiastes provides us a vertical and heavenly perspective as we view the horizontal nature of our lives on earth.  It is a lens that reassures us that all things matter because this life is not the end.  Our eternal life with God and the eternal nature of our relationships and actions here are earth are called into view.  Everything we do has an eternal impact and everything God is doing is about the salvation of souls.  Life.  Death.  All of it demonstrates a patient and loving God who is singularly focused on saving.

The house of mourning is not a place that we, by nature, would prefer to be but our Father says different and that we should go there and take to heart the eternal nature of our existence.  There is salvation in Jesus and destruction without.  It is the center theme to our lives here and in eternity.  It is what will be before us today and worthy of our consideration.  It is an opportunity to draw closer to our Savior, celebrate victory in Him and be encouraged as we leave and go back into the world knowing that everything we face is worth it when our race is run with Jesus and we go home to a loving God.

Finally, I want to share these passages as they were shared with me.  They are offered to help us as we work to understand God’s perspective for things that happen here, deal with the resulting emotions and search for peace and trust in God’s power.

Psalm 13:1-3; Romans 8:18; 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18; Revelation 14:12-13; John 14:1-6; 2 Corinthians 4:7-5:10; Philippians 1:20-30; 1 Corinthians 15:50-58